Mission Statement

Mission Statement

Photo: Evan Leeson. Creative Commons License LogoThis image is licensed under Creative Commons License.

To achieve our goals, we seek strategic partnerships with others who share our values. We are an independent organisation, that is, we determine our own priorities and policies.

We are based in the Federal Republic of Germany, yet we are an international actor in both ideal and practical terms.

Our namesake, the writer and Nobel Prize laureate Heinrich Böll, personifies the values we stand for: defence of freedom, civic courage, tolerance, open debate, and the valuation of art and culture as independent spheres of thought and action.

1. We Are a Green Think Tank

We promote democratic reforms and social innovation.

We work on ecological policies and sustainable development on a global level.

We provide space for the presentation of and debate on art and culture. 

We transfer knowledge and skills from experts to political actors. 

We provide a forum for open debate and promote dialogue between politics, business, academia, and society. 

We support talented students active on socio-political issues both in Germany and abroad.

We document the history of the Green movement in order to promote research and provide political inspiration.

2. We Are an International Policy Network

We are part of the global Green network and promote the development of the Green political movement on all continents.  

We focus especially on the broadening and deepening of the European Green movement.

We work actively for the development of a political European  public.

Together with the five partners Right to Play (RTP), War Child Holland (WCH) , Sawa, ACAD and ArtLab, the Heinrich Böll Stiftung Ramallah & Jordan has launched the EU-funded project on September 1st 2014

Our videos

View the Dossier on Boell.de

Green Economy is a source of both hope and controversy. For some, it points the way out of permanent environmental and economic crises and promises to reconcile – a long cherished Utopia – ecology and economics. It fosters the hope that we can hang on to our current high standard of material prosperity.

A Space for new Ideas, Discussions and Exchange

 

The hbs Palestine/ Jordan office in Ramallah opens the doors to its new rooftop conference room. We invite activist groups and NGOs, who share the values of the Heinrich-Böll-Foundation, to use the meeting room free of charge. It provides space for around 35 people and includes the possibility to project presentations or films.  It has a wonderful, wide view from Ramallah to Jerusalem.

To schedule meetings or acquire further information, please send an e-mail to info@ps.boell.org or call + 972 2 296 1121
The room is available during our office hours from Saturday to Thursday from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm.
In exceptional cases and with prior agreement meetings are possible outside of the office hours. 

Our Newsletter

Our newsletter features new publications, events and information about our work.

hbs Brochure

The hbs office in Ramallah opened in 1999. It currently operates as a regional office with responsibility for Palestine and Jordan. The activities of hbs are guided by the fundamental political values of universal human rights, ecology, democracy, solidarity, and non-violence. The hbs office Ramallah is working in close partnership with currently more than 20 local partner organizations in Gaza, East Jerusalem, the West Bank, and Jordan.

Perspectives

When women in the Middle East make the headlines, it is usually as victims. Disturbing stories of the so called 'Islamic State' (ISIS) kidnapping and raping tens of thousands of women are sadly often the ones which stick in the Western memory. But there is more to women's political lives in the region than their victimisation and oppression. We decided to look to the future, present and past in this issue, in order to present an alternative narrative which challenges these representations of women.

When ISIS announced the establishment of the so-called ‘Islamic State’ it fuelled discussions as to whether  this would herald  the ‘end of Sykes-Picot’ – borders artificially drawn by the colonial powers at the beginning of the twenti- eth century. But borders are more than ‘lines in the sand’: they divide. While the privileged few may cross legitimately  by simply presenting their passport, for most, these borders present difficult if not insurmountable hurdles. People fleeing from war, climate change  or economic hardship, attempt to cross the Mediterranean but many drown trying.

Subscribe to RSSSubscribe to RSS